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~Wellesley College Students Win NSF-REU Travel Awards~

For immediate release:
Jan. 28, 2003

CONTACT:
Arlie Corday,
781-283-3321


WELLESLEY, Mass. - Three Wellesley College students have been awarded National Science Foundation-Research Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) Chemistry Travel Awards. The students will use their awards to pay for their travel to the American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans in March, where they will present the results of their Summer 2002 participation in NSF-REU research programs.

The Wellesley recipients are: Calleen Joseph, a senior from Manchester, Conn. Her research project is titled "Bradykinin Hydrolysis by Cyanobacterial Cells Extracts," produced for the Chemical Education Division. A chemistry major, she completed her research last summer at the Wellesley College NSF-REU Chemistry Program under the direction of Jeff Sigman, visiting assistant professor, and Adele Wolfson, professor of chemistry.

Sarah Poe, a junior from Duluth, Minn., completed a research project on "Study of Biologically Relevant Lyotropic Liquid Crystals" for the Chemical Education Division. A chemistry major, she did her research last summer in the NSF-REU program at Harvey Mudd College in California.

Laura Stadelmann, a sophomore from Medfield, Mass., worked on a research project, "Radiation Chemistry of CF2Cl2: Implications for the Ozone Hole" for the Chemical Education Division. Her research was completed last summer in the Wellesley College NSF-REU program under the direction of Christopher Arumainayagam, associate professor.

Another student who received the award for her research at Wellesley last summer, Nicole Savig, completed a project, "Annulation onto 1,2,4-triazole via a Michael-type Reaction" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a senior chemistry major at Ashland University in Ohio, and did her research with David Haines, associate professor of chemistry at Wellesley.

"The award, which is presented by the NSF-REU Chemistry Leadership Group, is intended to draw undergraduate scientists into the chemistry community by enabling undergraduate chemists to present their research at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society," said Haines, who is a member of the group. "By showcasing the best in undergraduate research, we also hope to gain widespread recognition for the importance of undergraduate research in the training of scientists, and for the significant scientific contributions that come from the work of undergraduate scientists."

This year the NSF-REU awarded 50 Chemistry Leadership Group travel awards to students from 43 educational institutions. Eligibility for these awards was limited to undergraduates who had been supported by NSF-REU stipends during their summer research and to no more than three students from any one NSF-REU site. "Clearly, Wellesley College was very well represented among this group," Haines said.

American Chemical Society meetings are held twice a year and attract approximately 15,000 professional chemists. More than 5,000 presentations are given at these meetings, ranging from invited talks to posters. Undergraduates are full participants in the meetings.

"While most undergraduates present in the undergraduate poster sessions, occasionally, particularly accomplished undergraduates present in the divisional poster sessions alongside professional chemists and graduate students, such as another Wellesley College student researcher, Christine Worrall," Haines said. "No matter in which forum the presentation is given, the undergraduate presenters come away from the meeting more strongly identifying themselves as scientists and with an enhanced ownership of their contributions to scientific understanding."

The following Wellesley College students, who all worked with Haines on their projects, will also present their research at the meeting:

Hong-Ru Chen, a senior from Haleiwa, Hawaii, completed a project titled "Preparation of a Nicotinamide Nucleoside Analog via Enzymatic Ribosidation of 1,2,4-triazole" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a biological chemistry major.

Paula Freedman, a senior from Somerset, Mass., completed research on "Annulating Agents for Construction of Bicyclic 1,2,4-triazole Systems" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a neuroscience and classical civilization double major.

Esther Hyun, a senior from Manhasset Hills, N.Y., completed research on "Efficient Synthesis of 3-hydroxymethyl-1,2,4-triazole" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a neuroscience major.

Angelyn Larkin, a senior from Flushing, N.Y., completed "Synthesis of Selectively C-3 and N-4 Substituted [1,2,4]-triazoles" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a chemistry major.

Eleanora Mazzarella, a senior from Orcas, Wash., completed a project titled "Attempted Ring Addition to 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a neuroscience major.

Vandana Reddy, a senior from Lawrenceville, Ga., did a research project titled "Anions of 1-substituted-1,2,4-triazoles as Nucleophiles" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a neuroscience major.

Christine Worrall, a senior from Roseville, Minn., will discuss her projects, "Solvent and Counterion Effects on the NMR of Disubstituted Triazoliums," for the Organic Chemistry Division; and "Bicyclic Ring Systems from Appropriately Substituted Triazoles" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a biological chemistry major.

Other Wellesley College student presenters and their Wellesley professors who worked with them include:

Samantha Friedman, a senior from Boca Raton, Fla., produced a project, "Synthesis of a Thionated Inhibitor for Thimet Oligopeptidase" for the Chemical Education Division. A chemistry major, she worked with Julia Miwa, associate professor of chemistry.

Amanda Gardner, a senior from San Mateo, Calif., completed "Spectroscopy of Cr-acetylacetonate Complexes in Sol-Gel Glasses." A chemistry and computer science double major, she worked William Coleman, professor of chemistry.

Shyla Gowda, a junior from Potomac, Md., and Erzsi Szilagyi, a junior chemistry major from Kingwood, W. Va., completed "Conformational Effects of Increased Hydrogen Bonding on a b-hairpin" for the Chemical Education Division. They worked with Julia Miwa, associate professor of chemistry.

Seniors Jamie Kahn of Manhattan Beach, Calif., and Kathy Lee of Fullerton, Calif., worked on the research project, "Hydrogen Bonding Strength in 12-residue Peptides," for the Chemical Education Division. They worked with Julia Miwa, associate professor of chemistry.

Nozomi Nakayama, a senior from Mountain View, Calif., will co-present with Laura Stadelmann a research project titled, "Radiation Chemistry of CF2Cl2: Implications for the Ozone Hole" for the Chemical Education Division. She is a chemistry major and worked with Christopher Arumainayagam, associate professor of chemistry.

Tasneem Patwa, a senior from Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, worked with Jeff Sigman, visiting assistant professor, and Adele Wolfson, professor of chemistry, on her research project, "Denaturation Studies on Thimet Oligopeptidase with Urea Fluorescence Spectroscopy."

Laure-Anne Ventouras, a junior from Ville-la-Grand, France, completed "Synthesis of a 14-residue Cyclic Peptide" for the Chemical Education Division. A chemistry major, she worked with Julia Miwa, associate professor of chemistry.

Founded in 1875, Wellesley College has been a leader in liberal arts and the education of women for more than 125 years. The College's 500-acre campus near Boston is home to 2,300 undergraduate students.

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